Share Print Bookmark

Notes


Matches 1 to 50 of 104

      1 2 3 Next»

  Notes  Linked to 
1 1 _UPD 10 APR 2012 15:56:27 GMT-6 Family: F19
 
2 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family: F5
 
3 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family: F13
 
4 Ermengarde, heiress of her brother Geoffrey Martel, Count of Anjou, married Geoffrey, surnamed Ferole, Count of Gastinois, and was the mother of Fulk IV. Source: Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith - Burke's Royal Families of England, Scotland and Wales, Preface pp. XIX-XX; Part I, pp. 19-20, 22, 24-29. - Burke's Dormant and Extinct Peerage of England, pp. 200-1.

!NOTES: One listing has that her Father is: FULK III "The Black" Count of Anjou born-- 970 married-- after 1000 died-- 21 Jun 1040 married 2nd wife HILDEGRADE who was her mother FULK III's Father was GEOFFREY I "Grisgonelle" !SOURCES: Royal Ancestors of Some American Families; by Call, chart 11403 
ANJOU, Ermengarde, Countess Of Countess Of Gastinois
 
5 SOURCE: Elizabeth Hallam, "The Plantagenet Chronicles", (N.Y.: Weidenfedl & Nicholson, 1986), (Goldaming UK, 1995). CITATION: "Violent, charismatic and cruel, and a master of strategic castle-building"; "one of the most dramatic figures of the 11th century"; "Fulk Nerra undertook the pilgrimage to Jerusalem an astonishing three times in an age when few made this difficult journey even once. He also visited Rome, and founded two abbeys: Beaulieu-les-Loches near Tours and St. Nicholas at Angers. Behind these extremes was a man of policy and purpose, revealed in the effectiveness of his campaigns and the strategic siting of his castles. Fascinating yet repellent, he was a leader of undoubted if crude ability." NOTES: "Fulk Nerra strange wife, Melusine was believed to be the daughter of Lucifer! Fulk the Black came back from his travels with the beautiful Melusine. They had four children. Melusine rarely attended Mass, & always left before the equivalent of the communion/sacrament. Fulk was pressured into making her stay, & had four knights hold her in her place one day. She flew out the church window, taking two of their children with her." SOURCE: Henry Fichtenau, "Living in the Tenth Century", 1991 (paper 1993), p 327 (translation by Patrick Geary of "Lebensordnung des 10. Jahrhunderts". 1984) "When Fulk Nerra of Anjou captured and burned the town of Saumur in 1025, he shouted to the saint there, "Saint Florentius, let yourself be burned. I will build you a better home in Angers." But when the relics of the saint were brought to Angers, the transportation down the Loire caused unexpected difficulty, Fulk called the saint an impious rustic lout who did not want to come to the big city and sent the relics back to Saumur." SOURCE: Richard Erdoes, "AD 1000: Living on the Brink of Apocalypse", 1988, (reprint 1995) p 12. "Not all founders [of monasteries] were known for their kindness. Fulk of Anjou, plunderer, murderer, robber, and swearer of fale oaths, a truly te rrifying character of fiendish cruelty, founded not one but two large abbeys. This Fulk was filled with unbridled passion, a temper directed to extremes. Whenever he had the slightest difference with a neighbor he rushed upon his lands, ravaging, pillaging, raping, and killing; nothing could stop him, least of all the commandments of God. This appalling man had countless crimes upon his conscience, but when seized with a fit of remorse he abandoned himself to incredible penances. Thus the very tomb of St. Martin, whose monks he had ill-treated, saw him prostrate, with bare feet and in penitent's dress; and four times during his life he went to Jerusalem as a devout pilgrim, treading half-naked the sorrowful road of the passion while two of his servants flogged him until the blood flowed, crying, "Lord, receive thy perjured Fulk!" " Fulk III reigned as Count 987-1040. Acceded: 987

 
ANJOU, Folco III De
 
6 1 _UPD 10 APR 2012 19:54:54 GMT-6 BRYANT, John David
 
7 ANCESTRAL_FILE_NUMBER: AFN: 1131-V1

Source: Book Carolyn McGough Rowe "A Glimpse of the Past" (1988)
Direct Descendants of Robert McGough to Mattie Elizabeth McGough
1 Robert McGough b: 1725 Newry, County of Down, Northern Ireland>1773 Charleston, SC d: 1778 Prob Mecklinburg, NC, will dated 1778 Buried where: Unknown. Married Sarah Matilda" Carson b: Abt. 1725 Newry, County Down, Northern Ireland>1773 Charleston SC d: Abt. 1779 Mecklenburg CO, North Carolina, listed in Will of husband Robert Buried where: Unknown



Coming to America
The Carsons and the McGoughs were good friends. On June 19 or June 30, 1773, they sailed from Newry, Ireland to America. The ship could have been the Elliott, under the command of John Waring. It arrived in South Carolina on Aug. 18, 1773
Modified 20 May 2015 by Carla Filgas


Immigrating from Ireland to USA
Modified 30 Aug 2015 by Jennifer Kitchens




Emigrated around 1771. They landed in Charleston, S.C. after a voyage of some three months. From there they made their way overland to Mecklenburg, N.C. (Charlotte is in Mecklenburg, S.C.) There Robert McGough bought a tract of land in 1773 from Patrick Jack, a noted Scotch-Irish tavern keeper in Charlotte.

Perhaps saied in June 1773 on the Elliott.??

Our oldest ancestor was Robert McGough, Sr., who with his wife--who is traditionally called Matilda Carson McGough--left County Down in company with 40 others, neighbors and kinsmen by the name of Carson and McDowell. They sailed from the sea port of Newry on their way to Charleston, South Carolina. It was the year of 1771. After a stormy voyage that is said to have lasted three months, they finally landed at Charleston, more dead than alive.

They fled from Ireland because of British oppression

The McGoughs, along with related Carsons, McDowells and Pattersons, probably left Newry, Ireland, on June 19, 1773, and arrived at Charleston aboard the Elliott on August 18, 1773. The Elliott was advertised as a 300 ton sailing vessel that could carry 200 passengers and as the fastest sailing vessel owned by Ireland. The ship was owned by Newry interests. On April 23, 1773, she was advertised as sailing from Newry directly to Charleston on May 25. (Ships seldom left on the advertised sailing date.) The South Carolina Advertiser and General Magazine published a notice of the arrival of the Elliott in Charleston on August 20, 1773. This was the only direct voyage advertised from Newry to Charleston in 1773. Several other ships and routes are possible, including ships from Belfast which made a call at Newry. See: Ulster Emigration to Colonial America 1718–1775 by R. J. Dickson (1966), especially pages 236 and 263.

This was about the time of the Declaration of Independence, it will be remembered and America from the time of Robert McGough's landing was at war with Great Britain. There was no area in the whole south that was more of a hot bed of rebellion than Meclenburg County and surrounding area. It was at Charlotte that the famous Declaration of Independence was signed before the more famous one was signed in Philadelphia on July the 4th. The first settlers of the Mecklenburg area were almost 100 percent Scotch Irish Presbyterians and strongly opposed to Great Britain. The McGough’s were apparently right at home in the midst. 
CARSON, Sarah Matilda "Mary"
 
8
Fulk V "King of Jerusalem" d'Anjou aka Fulco, Foulque, Foulques
Born about 1089 [location unknown]
Son of Foulques (Anjou) d'Anjou and [mother unknown]
Brother of Ermengarde (Anjou) de Bretagne, Ivo Tallebois Kendal, Geoffrey IV Martel Anjou, Foulques (Anjou) d'Anjou andElias II (Elias) Anjou
Husband of Aremburga de la Fleche — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Father of Geoffrey (Anjou) Plantagenet
Died November 13, 1143 in Acre, Palestine [now ʿAkko, Israel], Buried ]



Fulk married 2nd Melisinde Daughter of King Baldwin II of Jerusalem on 2 Jun 1129 she died 11 Sep 1161 Folques V Count of Anjou france was burried in the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem He became King of Jerusalem 1143 was the 1st to invite a muslim to attend court with a King of Jerusalem he negotiated peace between Jerusalem & Damuscuc his son Baldwin II was the 1st King of Jerusalem born there 
COMTE DE ANJOU ET ROI DE JéRUSALEM, Foulques V
 
9 She arranged for her abduction from Fulk by Phillipe.

Moriarty 2, 10-11; Turton 230.

!Ridipath's Histories; Burk's Landed Gentry; Gareth Rice;

!SOURCE: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonist Who Came to America before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis, 7th Ed. (1992) 118-23. 
COUNTESS OF HOLLAND, Bertrade deMontfort
 
10 1 _UPD 10 APR 2012 15:56:27 GMT-6 CRULL, Agneta Dorothea Elisabeth
 
11 From BBC History:

King Henry II of England from 1154 to 1189, strengthened royal administration but suffered from quarrels with Thomas Becket and his own family.

King Henry II was born at Le Mans in north west France on 4 March 1133. His father was Count d'Anjou and his mother Matilda, daughter of King Henry I of England. Henry I had named Matilda as his successor to the English throne but her cousin Stephen had taken over.

In 1150 - 1151, Henry II became ruler of Normandy and Anjou, after the death of his father. In 1152, he married Eleanor of Aquitaine, the greatest heiress in Western Europe. In 1153, he crossed to England to pursue his claim to the throne, reaching an agreement that he would succeed Stephen on his death, which occurred in 1154.

King Henry II began to restore order. Using his talented chancellor Thomas Becket, Henry II began reorganizing he judicial system. The Assize of Clarendon (1166) established procedures of criminal justice, establishing courts and prisons for those waiting trial. In addition, the assizes gave fast and clear verdicts, enriched the treasury and extended royal control.

In 1164 Henry II reasserted his ancestral rights over the church. Now archbishop of Canterbury, Becket refused to comply. An attempted reconciliation failed and Becket punished priests who had co-operated with the King. On hearing this, King Henry II reportedly exclaimed, "Well no one rid me of this turbulent priest?" Four Knights took his words literally and murdered Becket in Canterbury Cathedral in December 1170. Almost overnight Becket became a saint. The King. reconciled himself with the church, but royal control over the church changed little.

In 1169, an Angle-Norman force landed in Ireland to support of of the claimants to the Irish high kingship. Fearing the creation of a separate Norman power to the west, the King traveled to Dublin to assert his overlordship of the territory they had won. And so and English presence in Ireland was established. In the course of his reign, Henry and dominion over territories stretching from the Ireland to the Pyrenees.

King Henry II now had problems within his own family. This sons — Henry III, Geoffrey, Richard and John — mistrusted each other and resented that their father's policy of dividing his properties among them. These were serious family disputes in 1173, 1181 and 1183. The King's attempt to find an inheritance for John led to opposition from Richard III and Philip II of France. King Henry II was forced to give way. News that John had turned against him thus hastened the King's death which came on 6 July 1189.  
CURTMANTLE PLANTAGENET II, Henry II
 
12 Empress Matilda (c. 7 February 1102 – 10 September 1167), also known as the Empress Maude,[nb 1] was the claimant to the English throne during the civil war known as the Anarchy. The daughter of King Henry I of England, she moved to Germany as a child when she married the future Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. She travelled with her husband into Italy in 1116, was controversially crowned in St. Peter's Basilica, and acted as the imperial regent in Italy. Matilda and Henry had no children, and when Henry died in 1125, the crown was claimed by Lothair II, one of his political enemies.

Meanwhile, Matilda's younger brother, William Adelin, died in the White Ship disaster of 1120, leaving England facing a potential succession crisis. On Henry V's death, Matilda was recalled to Normandy by her father, who arranged for her to marry Geoffrey of Anjou to form an alliance to protect his southern borders. Henry I had no further legitimate children and nominated Matilda as his heir, making his court swear an oath of loyalty to her and her successors, but the decision was not popular in the Anglo-Norman court. Henry died in 1135 but Matilda and Geoffrey faced opposition from the Norman barons and were unable to pursue their claims. The throne was instead taken by Matilda's cousin Stephen of Blois, who enjoyed the backing of the English Church. Stephen took steps to solidify his new regime, but faced threats both from neighbouring powers and from opponents within his kingdom.

In 1139 Matilda crossed to England to take the kingdom by force, supported by her half-brother, Robert of Gloucester, and her uncle, King David I of Scotland, while Geoffrey focused on conquering Normandy. Matilda's forces captured Stephen at the Battle of Lincoln in 1141, but the Empress's attempt to be crowned at Westminster collapsed in the face of bitter opposition from the London crowds. As a result of this retreat, Matilda was never formally declared Queen of England, and was instead titled the Lady of the English. Robert was captured following the Rout of Winchester in 1141, and Matilda agreed to exchange him for Stephen. Matilda became trapped in Oxford Castle by Stephen's forces that winter, and was forced to escape across the frozen River Isis at night to avoid capture. The war degenerated into a stalemate, with Matilda controlling much of the south-west of England, and Stephen the south-east and the Midlands. Large parts of the rest of the country were in the hands of local, independent barons.

Matilda returned to Normandy, now in the hands of her husband, in 1148, leaving her eldest son to continue the campaign in England; he eventually succeeded to the throne as Henry II in 1154. She settled her court near Rouen and for the rest of her life concerned herself with the administration of Normandy, acting on Henry's behalf when necessary. Particularly in the early years of her son's reign, she provided political advice and attempted to mediate during the Becket controversy. She worked extensively with the Church, founding Cistercian monasteries, and was known for her piety. She was buried under the high altar at Bec Abbey after her death in 1167. 
D'NORMANDIE, Empress Matilda
 
13 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. DAVIS, J.S.
 
14
Thierry "the Chamberlain", comte d'Autun
Birth circa 820 Autun, Saône-et-Loire, Burgundy, France
Death: Died November 30, 880 in Chaumois, Saone-Et-Loire, Bourgogne, France; Immediate Family:
Son of Childébrand III, count of Autun and Dunne d'Autun
Husband of Avane de Chalons and N.N. de Bourgogne
Father of Thierry II, comte de Chaunois and Richard de Chaunois, comte de Troyes
Brother of Eckhard, seigneur de Perracy; Nivelon II de Perracy; Bernard de Perracy; Ade? de Perracy; Richard de Troyes and 1 other
Half brother of Theodoric Count De Vermandois, Bourgogne and Theodoric I
Occupation:Comte d'Autun, Chamberlain of Charles, "The bald", king of the West Franks, comte d'Autun 
DE PERRACY, Duke Theodoric I "the Chamberlain" I - of Burgandy - d'Autun
 
15 Aénor de Châtellerault, duchess of Aquitaine
Nicknames: "Aénor de Rochefoucauld"
Birthdate: 1103
Birthplace: Châtellerault, Poitou-Charentes, France
Death: Died 1130 in Talmont-sur-Gironde, Charente-maritime, Poitou-Charentes, France
Place of Burial:
France
Immediate Family:
Daughter of Aimery I, vicomte de Châtellérault and Dangereuse de L'Isle Bouchard
Wife of William X, Duke of Aquitaine
Mother of Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen of France and England; Petronilla (Alix) (Pernelle) d'Aquitaine and Guillaume d'Aquitaine
Sister of Raoul de Châtellerault, seigneur de Faye-le-Vineuse; Hugues III, viscount of Châtellerault and Amable de Chastellerault
 
DE ROCHEFOUCAULD, Eleanor Châtellérault
 
16 Jana Dabel was bap. in Anna Foords behalf. Jana is Anna's 9th gr.
grandaughter.
Connie Ball Dabel did the endowment in behalf of Anna Foord.
Connie is Anna's 8th granddaughter. 
FOORD, Agnes
 
17 King Marcomer IV (?-169) of the Franks, founded the city of Marburg, Germany, married Princess Athildis of Camulod (?-?), elder sister of King Lleiffer Mawr (or Lucius) of Britain

There are three legends concerning the ancient Merovingian dynasty:

1.) That their Sicambrian roots stretch back to the lost Hebrew tribe of Benjamin, which fled Israel following a civil war and voyaged to Greece where they become intermarried with the princes of Arcadia and supposedly helped found ancient Troy. At about the time of the Roman conquest of Greece, these "Benjaminites" journeyed north to the mouth of the Danube River on the Black Sea and eventually followed it west to ancient Gaul along the way absorbing into their ranks smaller Germanic groups.

2.) Through marriages with Visigoth nobility from southern France and Spain they descend from the Desposyni (descendants of the relatives the Christ family) that fled the Holy Lands following the crucifixion and settled in south France.

3.) That the royal line possessed magical powers and were more priest-kings than political rulers. These magical powers were centered in their long hair like Samson of the Bible, which they never cut leading to the name "the long haired kings." When Pepin "the Short" deposed the last of the Merovingian kings with the help of the Pope, he refuses to have "holy blood" on his hands and instead had the king's head shaven and then had him locked away in a monastery for the rest of his life. It is an interesting fact to note that Pepin tried to lend legitimacy to his usurping of the Frankish throne by marrying a Merovingian descendant, Countess Bertha "Big Foot."

from http://osdir.com/ml/culture.templar.rosemont/2003-04/msg00154.html

Read more at Geni.com on sources below. 
FRANKS, King Marcomir IV of the
 
18 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. KIMBROUGH, N.
 
19 DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR

WILLIAM I, 'the Conqueror', Duke of Normandy (1035); King of England (1066), *c.1027/8 at Falaise Castle, + 9.9.1087 at the Priory of St. Guavas, Rouen from wounds received at the siege of Mantes, and buried at St. Stephen’s Abbey, Caen, Normandy, Md. c.1050, Matilda of Flanders * c.1032, +2.11.1083 at Caen, Normandy, d. of Baldwin V, Count of Flanders and Adela of France.
A1. Robert 'Curthose', Duke of Normandy (1087-1106), * c.1052/4, + c.15.2.1135 at Cardiff Castle, a prisoner of his brother, Henry, Md. 1100 at Apulia, Sicily, Sybilla of Conversano, + 1103 at Rouen, Normandy probably in childbirth, dau. of Geoffrey, Count of Conversano.
B1. William 'Clito', Count of Flanders (1127), * 1101 at Rouen, Normandy, + 27.7.1128 at the Abbey of St. Bertin, St. Omer, France of wounds received at the battle of Alost, Md.1) 1123 (annulled 1124), Sybilla of Anjou, *c.1112, + 1165, d. of Fulk V, Count of Anjou; Md.2) Jan. 1128, Joan of Montferrat, dau. Of Ranieri, Marquess of Montferrat.
B2. Henry of Normandy, * 1102, + Killed while hunting in the New Forest (year unknown).
B3. Illegitimate Richard of Normandy, + 1100, Killed in the New Forest.
B4. Illegitimate William of Normandy, Lord of Tortosa, +1110, Killed at the Battle of Jerusalem.
B5. A Daughter, Md. Helias of Saint-Saens, Count of Arques.
A2. Richard, Duke of Bernay, * c.1054, + c.1075, gored by a stag in the New Forest.
A3. WILLIAM II 'Rufus', King of England (1087-1100), * c.1056, + 2.8.1100, possibly murdered by an arrow in the back on the orders of his brother Henry, while hunting in the New Forest.
A4. HENRY I 'Beauclerk' of Normandy, Lord of Domfront (1092), Count of Coutances and Bayeux (1096), King of England (1100), * Sept. 1068 at Selby, Yorkshire, + 1/2.12.1135 at St Denis le Fermont, nr. Rouen, Normandy of food poisoning, buried in Reading Abbey, Berkshire, Md.1) 11.11.1100, at Westminster Abbey, Matilda (Edith) of Scotland, * c.1080, + 1.5.1118, at the Palace of Westminster and buried in Westminster Abbey, d. of Malcolm III, King of Scotland and St. Margaret of Wessex.
B1. William of Normandy, Duke of Normandy (1120), * c.5.8.1103, + 25.11.1120, drowned in the sinking of the White Ship off Barfleur, Md. June 1119 at Lisieux, Normandy, Matilda of Anjou, * c.1107, + 1154 at Fontevrault Abbey where she had become a nun in c.1121, dau of Fulk V, Count of Anjou.
B2. Richard of Normandy, + 25.11.1120 drowned in the White Ship.
B3. Euphemia, * c.Aug. 1101, + young.ABC
B4. Adelaide (adopted name of Matilda), * 1102 at Winchester or London, + 10.9.1167 at the Abbey of Notre Dame des Pres, nr. Rouen, Normandy and finally buried in Rouen Cathedral (See Image) Md.1) 7.1.1114, Henry V, Emperor of Germany, + 1125; Md.2)c.3.4.1128 at Le Mans Cathedral, Anjou, Geoffrey Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, *24.8.1113, + 7.9.1151 at the Chateau du Loire, France.
C1. HENRY II 'Curtmantle' Count of Touraine and Maine (1151), Duke of Normandy and Count of Anjou (1151), D. of Aquitaine (1152), King of England (1154), * 5.3.1133 at Le Mans, Anjou, + 6.7.1189 at Chinon Castle, France and buried in Fontevrault Abbey, France (See Image) Md. 18.5.1152 at Poitiers Cathedral, Poitou, Eleanor of Aquitaine, * c.1120 at Poitiers or Bordeaux, + 1.4.1204 at Fontevrault Abbey, France and is buried there (See Image) d. of William X, Duke of Aquitaine and Aenor de Rochefourauld.
D1. William, Count of Poitiers, * 17.8.1153, + c.Apr. 1156 at Wallingford Castle, Berkshire.
D2. Henry (crowned king in 1170), * 28.2.1155 at Bermondsey Palace, Surrey, + 11.6.1183 at Martel in Quercy, France and buried in Le Mans Cathedral, Anjou, Md. 2.11.1160 at Rouen Cathedral, Normandy, Margaret of France, * 1158, + 1197 at Acre on pilgrimage to the Holy Land, d. of Louis VII, King of France and Constance of Castile.
E1. William of England, * 19.6.1177 in Paris, + 22.6.1177 in Paris.
D3. RICHARD I 'Coeur de Lion' Plantagenet, Duke of Aquitaine (1173), King of England (1189), * 8.9.1157 at Beaumont Palace, Oxford, + 6.4.1199 at Chalus, France from an arrow wound received in the siege of that city and buried in Fontevrault Abbey, France, Md. 12.5.1191 at the Chapel of St. George, Limassol, Cyprus, Berengaria of Navarre, * c.1165, d. of Sancho VI, King of Navarre an Beatrice of Castile.
D4. Geoffrey Plantagenet, Earl of Richmond, Duke of Brittany (1181), * 23.9.1158, + 19.8.1186 in Paris from a fever brought on by being trampled in a tournament, Md. July 1181, Constance of Brittany, * c.1160, + c.5.9.1201 at Nantes, Brittany and buried in Villeneuve Abbey, Nantes, Brittany, dau. of Conan IV, Duke of Brittany and Margaret of Huntingdon (grand-daughter of David I, King of Scotland).
E1. Arthur Plantagenet, Count of Brittany, * 29.3.1187 at Nantes, Brittany, + 3.4.1203, murdered on the orders of his uncle, King John.
E2. Eleanor Plantagenet, Countess of Richmond, * 1184, + 10.8.1241 at Bristol Castle. She spent much of her life a prisoner and was probably murdered.
E3. Matilda Plantagenet, * 1185, + young.
D5. JOHN 'Lackland' Plantagenet, Count of Mortain (1189), King of England (1199), * 24.12.1166 at Beaumont Palace, Oxford, + 19.10.1216 at Newark Castle, Nottinghamshire and buried in Worcester Cathedral, Md.1) 29.8.1189 (annulled 1199) at Marlborough Castle, Wiltshire, Isabella of Gloucester, * bef. 1176, + 1217 and buried in Canterbury Cathedral; Md2) 24.8.1200 at Bordeaux Cathedral, Gascony, France, Isabella of Angouleme, * c.1187, + 31.5.1246, d of Aymer Taillefer, Count of Angouleme and Alice de Courtenay.





BIOGRAPHY: Reigned 1199-1216. Signed the Magna Charta in 1215 at Runnymede. His reign saw the renewal of war with Philip II Agustus of France, to whom he lost several continental possessions including Normandy by 1205. He came into conflict with the Barons and was forced to sign the Maga Charta. His later repudiation of the charter led to the first Baron's War 1215-17, during which John died. Burke says b. 1160. King of Ireland 1177, Count of Mortain 1189, Earl of Gloucester. (Royal Index)



from thepeerage.com, 2/2009:
John I 'Lackland', King of England1
M, #102006, b. 24 December 1167, d. 19 October 1216
John I 'Lackland', King of England|b. 24 Dec 1167\nd. 19 Oct 1216|p10201.htm#i102006|Henry II 'Curtmantle' d'Anjou, King of England|b. 5 Mar 1133\nd. 6 Jul 1189|p10202.htm#i102013|Eleanor, Duchesse d'Aquitaine|b. bt 1120 - 1122\nd. 1 Apr 1204|p10202.htm#i102014|Geoffrey V. Plantagenet, Comte d'Anjou et Maine|b. 24 Aug 1113\nd. 7 Sep 1151|p10205.htm#i102047|Matilda 'the Empress' of England|b. c Aug 1102\nd. 10 Sep 1167|p10204.htm#i102037|Guillaume X., Duc d'Aquitaine|b. 1099\nd. 9 Apr 1137|p10251.htm#i102510|Eleanor C. de Rochefoucauld|b. 1103\nd. a Mar 1130|p10487.htm#i104870|
Last Edited=30 Dec 2008
Consanguinity Index=0.44%
John I 'Lackland', King of England was born on 24 December 1167 at Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England .1 He was the son of Henry II 'Curtmantle' d'Anjou, King of England and Eleanor, Duchesse d'Aquitaine . He married, firstly, Isabella de Clare, Countess of Gloucester, daughter of William FitzRobert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester and Hawise de Beaumont , on 29 August 1189 at Marlborough Castle, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England .1 He and Isabella de Clare, Countess of Gloucester were divorced in 1199, on the grounds of consanguinity.1 He married, firstly, Isabella d'Angoulême, daughter of Aymer Taillefer, Comte d'Angoulême and Alice de Courtenay , on 24 August 1200 at Bordeaux Cathedral, Bordeaux, Dauphine, France .2 He died on 19 October 1216 at age 48 at Newark Castle, Newark, Nottinghamshire, England .3 He was buried at Worcester Cathedral, Worcester, Worcestershire, England .3
John I 'Lackland', King of England and unknown de Warenne were associated.4 He gained the title of King John I of Ireland in 1177.1 He gained the title of Count of Mortain in 1189.1 As a result of his marriage, John I 'Lackland', King of England was styled as Earl of Gloucester on 29 August 1189.1 He succeeded to the title of King John I of England on 6 April 1199.1 He was crowned King of England on 27 May 1199 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England , and styled 'Rex Anglaie, Dominus Hiberniae, Dux Normanniae, et Dux Aquitaniae.5'
He was a skilled politician and forceful administrator, but one of England's most unpopular monarchs due to his cruelty and deceit. While Richard I was imprisoned abroad, in 1193 John vainly attempted to usurp the throne. He was banished, but soon reconciled and made his brother's heir. On Richard's death, John became king and imprisoned his young nephew Arthur of Brittany, a better claimant who soon died in prison. He married Isabella of Gloucester and then divorced her after his accession to the throne and married Isabella of Angouleme. John imposed crippling taxes and tightened the already severe forest laws, all to raise revenue for his war against the French. This war cost him Normandy and led to high inflation resulting in widespread poverty. He antagonised the Church bringing on an interdict from the Pope, and John himself was excommunicated. The whole population, high and low alike, were in a state of near rebellion. The barons drew up a document which they were intent upon John signing. This document was not a formal constitution but a practical statement that the King must respect institutional customs and law. On Monday 15 June 1215 King John reluctantly signed and sealed the document on the island of Runnymeade in the Thames. This was one of the most memorable events in English history, the document being known as the Magna Carta. Afterwards, John reverted to his bad old ways and Louis, son of the French King, was invited to replace him. Louis entered London unopposed in May 1216 and civil war began to flame. Fortunately for England, John died of dysentry on Wednesday 19 October 1216 at Newark after losing the crown jewels in the Wash. He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.6
Children of John I 'Lackland', King of England and Hawise de Tracy
Oliver (?) d. 12907
Osbert Gifford d. 12167
Geoffrey FitzRoy d. 12057
John FitzJohn 7
Odo FitzRoy d. c 12427
Ivo (?) 7
Henry (?) 7
Richard of Wallingford 7
Matilda of Barking 7
Isabella la Blanche 7
Child of John I 'Lackland', King of England and Clementina (?)
Joan (?) + b. b 1195, d. 12377
Children of John I 'Lackland', King of England and Isabella d'Angoulême
Henry III, King of England + b. 1 Oct 1207, d. 16 Nov 1272
Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall + b. 5 Jan 1209, d. 2 Apr 12728
Joan of England b. 22 Jul 1210, d. 4 Mar 1238
Isabella of England + b. 1214, d. 1 Dec 1241
Eleanor of England + b. 1215, d. 13 Apr 1275
Child of John I 'Lackland', King of England and unknown de Warenne
Richard Fitzroy, Baron of Chilham + b. b 1216, d. fr 1245 - 12467
Citations
[S11 ] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 65. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.
[S11 ] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family, page 66.
[S11 ] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family, page 71.
[S79 ] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry (Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004), page 748. Hereinafter cited as Plantagenet Ancestry.
[S4 ] C.F.J. Hankinson, editor, DeBretts Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage and Companionage, 147th year (London, U.K.: Odhams Press, 1949), page 20 . Hereinafter cited as DeBretts Peerage, 1949.
[S18 ] Matthew H.C.G., editor, Dictionary of National Biography on CD-ROM (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1995). Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography.
[S105 ] Brain Tompsett, Royal Genealogical Data, online <>. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogical Data.
[S37 ] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003). Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
 
LACKLAND PLANTAGENET, King John
 
20 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. LINDSEY, C.A.
 
21 Erembourg du Maine, ou Eremburge, Aremburge du Maine ou de Beaugency ou de la Flèche, morte en 1126, fut comtesse du Maine et dame de Château-du-Loir de 1110 à 1126. Elle était fille d'Élie Ier de la Flèche, comte du Maine, et de Mathilde de Château du Loir.

En juillet 1110, elle épouse Foulque V le Bel, comte d'Anjou et de Tours, et lui apporte le comté du Maine, qui est définitivement rattaché à l'Anjou. Elle donne naissance à :

Mathilde († 1154), née sous le nom d'Alice (Isabelle) d'Anjou, mariée en 1119 à Guillaume Adelin († 1120), fils et héritier du roi Henri Ier d'Angleterre
Geoffroy V le Bel ou Plantagenêt († 1151), comte d'Anjou, de Tours, du Maine et duc de Normandie.
Hélie II († 1151), comte du Maine.
Sibylle († 1165), mariée en 1123 à Guillaume Cliton. Le mariage est annulé en 1124, et elle se remarie en 1134 avec Thierry d'Alsace († 1168), comte de Flandre.
Elle meurt en 1126, le 14 ou le 15 janvier 1126 ou encore le 12 octobre 1126. Après sa mort, Foulque abandonne ses comtés à leur fils Geoffroy et part en Terre sainte, où il épouse Mélisende de Jérusalem en 1129 et devient roi de Jérusalem. 
MAINE, Ermengarde Ermentrude Du
 
22 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. MCGOUGH, A.F.
 
23 1 _UPD 10 APR 2012 14:14:57 GMT-6 MCGOUGH, Eugene Lovert
 
24 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. MCGOUGH, M.A.
 
25 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. MCGOUGH, O.F. JR
 
26 1 _UPD 10 APR 2012 19:51:18 GMT-6 MCGOUGH, Robert Franklin
 
27 1 _UPD 10 APR 2012 14:15:05 GMT-6 MCGOUGH, Robert Joseph
 
28 ANCESTRAL_FILE_NUMBER: AFN: 1131-V0

On Oct. 24, 1773 Robert McGough bought 150 acres in the Providence Presbyterian Church Community along McCalpanes Creek in Mecklenburg County, N Carolina 
MCGOUGH, Robert Joseph
 
29 1 _UPD 10 APR 2012 14:15:14 GMT-6


Henry Fredrick William Tarnow was born 27 November 1818 in Germany, most likely in Rostock, Mecklinburg Schwerin. According to the Muster and Descriptive Roll of Company E, Henry was 5' 6" tall, with gray eyes; dark hair and light complected. According to family history, our Henry left Germany to avoid fighting in a war for causes he felt were unjust. We do not know when he came to America, in which ship he made the journey, or the port of entry. Henry was 30 years old when he filed a Declaration of Intention to become an American Citizen in St. Louis, Missouri on 31 March 1849. (Several attempts at getting this record have failed) Henry Tarnow and Nancy Sheffield were married 26 August 1855 in Jefferson County, Missouri and he became a U.S. citizen ~ renounced all allegiance to foreign Power "and particularly to the Grand Duke of Mecklinburg Schwerin of whom he is at present a subject" ~ 20 April 1860 in St. Louis, Missouri.
If we have Amandus' place of birth correct, the family was in Atchison, Kansas by 20 January 1862. Why did Henry leave Missouri? Did the talk of Civl War disturb him? Remember this was a man with ant-war sentiments. What was the planned destination and how did the family travel? Overland Stage ? Were they delayed at Atchison? The county government had strong views on slavery . Was Henry encouraged to join the War between the States?
Within the last week (Sept 25th), Mary K. Jones discovered a reference to Henry Tarnow, of Atchison, Kansas; enlisting in the Union: Co K., 13th Infantry Regiment Kansas on 20 September 1862; and deserting on 19 October 1862 in Drywood Creek, Kansas. According to Civil War history books, soldiers had to travel through unfamiliar territories with wooded areas and rugged terrains; ocassionally separated from their ranks; and reported as deserters by their superior officers. Is that what happened in this case? Or, was Henry forced to join the fight and escape shortly after his enlistment? We do not have proof this is our Henry. Mary is requesting the military records from NARA. If this was our Henry, was he related to John Tarnow, another soldier who joined the same Regiment?
We do not know when Henry left Kansas and return to Missouri. We believe he was the same Henry Tarnow who joined for 1 year service in the Union, Company E, 144th Infantry August 23, 1864 at Alton, Illinois by Lt. Col A. F. Rogers; Mustered into service Sept 7, 64 by D. M. Farland at Alton, Madison County, Illinois; Mustered out July 14, 1865 at Springfield, Illinois by Capt Hall.
Muster and Descriptive Roll of Company E
Description Nativity
Soldier's Name Rank Age Feet Inches Hair Eyes Complexion Occupation Town State

Tarnow, Henry Private 45 5 6 Dark Gray Light Married Farmer Alton Germany
We know Henry and family were in Jefferson County, Missouri by 1870 when he and family were enumerated as follows:
Population Schedule of the Ninth Census of the United States 1870 - Roll 783 Missouri Volume 14 (1-393)
Jefferson County, Meramec Twp., Line 9
85 / 85 Taurna, Henry 52 M W School Teacher 500/200 Mecklenburg
Nancy 36 F W Keeping House Missouri
Mary 13 F W At School do
John 13 M W do do do
Charles 12 M W do do do
Amandus 8 M W do do
Augustus 6 M W do do
Henry 5 M W do do
Nancy 2 F W do do
Children of Henry Tarnow and Nancy Sheffield are:
Mary Margaret Tarno , b. 05 May 1857, MO; d. 09 August 1923, Woodruff County, AR.
John William Tarno , b. 29 March 1858, MO; d. 01 September 1926, Kaufman, Kaufman County, TX.
Charles Henry Tarno, b. 30 May 1859, MO.
Albert Lorenzo Tarno, b. 05 September 1860; d. 28 August 1861.
Amandus M. Tarno , b. 20 January 1862, (Atchison County?) KS.
Andrew Jackson Tarno, b. 30 January 1863; d. 13 October 1866.
James Augustus Tarno, b. 14 January 1865; d. 16 March 1878, According to M.E. Harding, " Gussie died at 14" .
Henry Edward Tarno , b. 09 August 1866, MO; d. 31 December 1933, Flint, Genesee County, MI.
Nancy Meleta Elizabeth Tarno , b. 05 January 1869; d. 30 December 1945, Center Point, Howard County, AR.
Agness Tarno, b. 09 January 1871; d. Abt. 1873, According to M.E. Harding, "Agness died at 21/2 years old ".
According to a family member, Henry Tarnow died 25 March 1880. I do not know the source for this information and we do not know where he died. Most of his children were living in Lindsey households when the 1880 Woodruff County, Arkansas census was enumerated. His daughter, Mary married December 1879 in Woodruff. If Henry date of death is correct then we must assume he died in the same county. I do not know if Bible records exist for the Tarno / Tarnow family. 
TARNO, William Henry Fredrick
 
30 1 _UPD 10 APR 2012 15:28:22 GMT-6 TARNOW, Agnes Dorothea Sophia
 
31 1 _UPD 10 APR 2012 15:56:27 GMT-6 TARNOW, Joachim Jacob Daniel
 
32 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: Addie Beasley in household of F G Beasley, "United States Census, 1920"
 
33 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: Addiedee Beasley in household of Felix G Beasley, "United States Census, 1910"
 
34 "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XBZ9-34D : 8 December 2014), Agnes Foord, 28 Aug 1653; citing DUNDEE,ANGUS,SCOTLAND, reference , index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 993,421.
This extracted record was used to create this person in Family Tree. 
Source: Agnes Foord, "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950"
 
35 "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XBZ9-34F : 8 December 2014), Agnis Foord, 11 Dec 1655; citing DUNDEE,ANGUS,SCOTLAND, reference , index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 993,421.
This extracted record was used to create this person in Family Tree. 
Source: Agnis Foord, "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950"
 
36 Pg 102 Line 108
Pg 106
Pg 107 Line 118-22
Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr.
7th ed., at 106 (1992) 
Source: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700
 
37 Ancestry Family Tree Source: Ancestry Family Trees
 
38 Ancestry Family Tree Source: Ancestry Family Trees
 
39 "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XYJT-TZR : 8 December 2014), Anna Foord in entry for Anna Cloudslie, 01 Mar 1681; citing MONTROSE,ANGUS,SCOTLAND, reference , index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 993,495, 993,497.
This extracted record was used to create this person in Family Tree. 
Source: Anna Foord in entry for Anna Cloudslie, "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950"
 
40 "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XYJR-B88 : 8 December 2014), Anna Foord in entry for Helen Cloudslay, 08 Aug 1686; citing MONTROSE,ANGUS,SCOTLAND, reference , index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 993,495, 993,497.
This extracted record was used to create this person in Family Tree. 
Source: Anna Foord in entry for Helen Cloudslay, "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950"
 
41 "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XYJY-LQS : 8 December 2014), Anna Foord in entry for James Cludslie, 01 May 1683; citing MONTROSE,ANGUS,SCOTLAND, reference , index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 993,495, 993,497.
This extracted record was used to create this person in Family Tree. 
Source: Anna Foord in entry for James Cludslie, "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950"
 
42 "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XYJT-SPG : 8 December 2014), Anna Foord in entry for Jean Cloudslay, 10 May 1685; citing MONTROSE,ANGUS,SCOTLAND, reference , index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 993,495, 993,497.
This extracted record was used to create this person in Family Tree. 
Source: Anna Foord in entry for Jean Cloudslay, "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950"
 
43 "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XYJY-1Q4 : 8 December 2014), Anna Foord in entry for Robert Cloudslay, 25 Nov 1688; citing MONTROSE,ANGUS,SCOTLAND, reference , index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 993,495, 993,497.
This extracted record was used to create this person in Family Tree. 
Source: Anna Foord in entry for Robert Cloudslay, "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950"
 
44 "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XYJY-VM1 : 8 December 2014), Anna Foord in entry for Thomas Cludslie, 01 May 1683; citing MONTROSE,ANGUS,SCOTLAND, reference , index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 993,495, 993,497.
This extracted record was used to create this person in Family Tree. 
Source: Anna Foord in entry for Thomas Cludslie, "Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950"
 
45 "Scotland Marriages, 1561-1910," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XTV3-W44 : 8 December 2014), James Cloudslie and Anna Foord, 30 Jun 1674; citing Dun,Angus,Scotland, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 993,419.
This extracted record was used to create this person in Family Tree. 
Source: Anna Foord, "Scotland Marriages, 1561-1910"
 
46 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: Dorothy F Mcgough in household of Robert F Mcgough, "United States Census, 1940"
 
47 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: Edward D Tarno, "Find A Grave Index"
 
48 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: Edward D Tarno, "United States Social Security Death Index"
 
49 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: Edward Tarno in household of Amandus Tarno, "United States Census, 1910"
 
50 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Source: Edward Tarnoe in household of Amandus Tarnoe, "United States Census, 1930"
 

      1 2 3 Next»